Sixth Grade

 

Religion

The focus of religious study in sixth grade is on the Old Testament.  Through this study of the Old Testament, students will recount key events of salvation history, learn to understand the theology related to salvation, be able to discuss how God revealed Himself to his chosen people and how He continues to call the faithful to Him through ministry, prayer, and the sacraments. Students will combine action with the course of study stewardship projects and participation in weekly mass.  
Text:    William H. Sadlier, Inc., We Believe, 2003  
McBride, Teen Catechism, 1996         

 

Social Studies

The focus for sixth grade is on the continued development of knowledge and skills acquired in previous social studies programs. Students will study Europe (including Russia) and South America by examining social, economic, and political institutions as they analyze similarities and differences among societies. While concepts are drawn from history and the social sciences, the primary discipline is geography, especially cultural geography. This focus provides students with a framework for studying local, regional, national and global issues that concern them; understanding the interdependence of the world in which they live; and making informed judgments as active citizens.
Text:    Glencoe McGraw-Hill, Exploring Our World: South America, Europe, and Russia, 2008

 

Language Arts

Literature and Writing
Sixth grade students use oral language, written language, media and technology for expressive, informational, argumentative, critical, and literary purposes. Students also explore the structure of language and study grammatical rules in order to speak and write effectively. While emphasis in sixth grade is placed on personal expression, students also:
  • Interpret and synthesize information
  • Develop an understanding of the foundations of argument
  • Critically analyze print and non-print communication
  • Use effective sentence construction and edit for improvements in sentence formation, usage, mechanics, and spelling
  • Interpret and evaluate a wide range of literature
In 6th grade, students learn the foundations of argument. Students learn through exploration of a variety of materials how to recognize effective arguments by summarizing the author’s purpose and stance, by distinguishing between fact and opinion, and through developing an awareness of audience. Students in grade 6 should be able to respond to public documents such as editorials and school or community policies.
Texts: Pearson, Prentice Hall Literature, Grade 6, 2005
Supplemental Books: 
Any Small Goodness by Tony Johnston 
The Cay by Theodore Taylor
Freak the Mighty by Rodman Philbrick
The Watsons Go to Birmingham by Christopher Paul Curtis
Blue by Joyce Moyer Hostetter
Al Capone Does My Shirts by Jennifer Choldenko
Summer Reading
Each year students will choose from a variety of thematically selected novels, varying in genre and Lexile level. Students will be required to read one novel and write a paper focused on the theme of the summer reading assignment. The novel choices and themes will change yearly.
This is a sampling of a summer reading list from a previous year. The theme of this summer reading list was friendship.
El Deafo by Cece Bell (Graphic Novel)
Fish in a Tree by Linda Mullaly Hunt (Fiction)
The Honest Truth by Dan Gemeinhart (Fiction)
All the Answers by Kate Messner (Fiction)
Crossover by Kwame Alexander (Poetry and Fiction)
I Will Always Write Back:  How One Letter Changed Two Lives by Caitlin Alifrenka, Martin Ganda, and with Liz Welch (Nonfiction)
Speech
The focus of study in sixth grade Speech (Public Speaking) is to foster an understanding of the techniques and practices that speakers use when presenting a topic to audiences of varying size and diversity. 
Text:  National Textbook Company, Basics of Speech, 1990
Grammar
The focus of the Grammar curriculum in 6th grade is to:
  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  • Know language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. 
  • Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple meaning words and phrases based on grade 6 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies
  • Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings
  • Acquire and use accurately grade appropriate general academic and domain specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension of expression
Text:    Glencoe McGraw-Hill, Writer’s Choice: Grammar and Composition, Grade 6, 2004 
William H. Sadlier, Inc., Vocabulary Workshop Level A, 2005

 

Science

Students begin studying the properties of waves and the wavelike property of energy.  They investigate the relationship among visible light, the electromagnetic spectrum and sight. The relationship between the rate of vibration and the medium through which vibrations travel, sound and hearing is also learned.
Understanding the structure, classification, and physical properties of matter are discussed next.  Students recognize that all matter is made up of atoms and atoms of the same element are alike, but are different from the atoms of other elements. This includes the effect of heat on the motion of atoms through a description of what happens to particles during a change in phase. They compare physical properties of pure substances such as volume, mass, and density.  Examples of conduction, radiation, convection, and what the result may be are demonstrated.
An understanding of the earth/moon/sun system, and the properties, structures, and predictable motions of celestial bodies in the Universe are covered.  How the relative motion and relative position of the sun, Earth and moon affect the seasons, tides, phases of the moon, and eclipses are learned.  Also there is an investigation of what it would take to survive life on the surface of other planets.
A unit on the basic structures and functions of plants and how they are required for survival, reproduction and defense is covered.  In addition, the significance of the processes of photosynthesis, respiration, and transpiration to the survival of green plants and other organisms is discussed.
Text:    Discovery Education Science Techbook
 

Math

Sixth Grade Glencoe Math Course 1 students are placed in either grade level or advanced classes.  Glencoe Math Course 1 is organized into units based on groups of related standards called domains. The standards for  mathematical practices are embedded throughout the course.
The curriculum includes, but is not limited to:
  • Ratios and Rates
  • Fractions, Decimals, and Percents
  • Compute with Multi-Digit numbers
  • Multiply and Divide Fractions
  • Integers and the Coordinate Plane
  • Expressions
  • Equations
  • Functions and Inequalities
  • Area
  • Volume and Surface Area
  • Statistical Measures
  • Statistical Displays
ALEKS Math Lab
ALEKS is an adaptive, online math program that uses artificial intelligence and open-response questioning to identify precisely what each student knows and doesn’t know. Through truly individualized learning and assessment, ALEKS delivers a personalized learning path using the exact topics each student is most ready to learn.
www.ALEKS.com
Text:    Glencoe McGraw-Hill, Math Accelerated:  A Pre-algebra Program, 2014

 

 

Seventh Grade

 

Religion

The focus of religious study in seventh grade is on the New Testament.  Through the study of the New Testament, students will recount key events of salvation history and learn how God reveals Himself to us in our lives and through the New Testament.  Students will be asked to read the Bible and reflect upon the life of Jesus and how God, through the ministry and teachings of His son Jesus Christ, offers us salvation. They will be able to discuss how God calls us to eternal life and describe and discuss obstacles to salvation.  Students will combine action with the course of study through stewardship projects and participation in weekly Mass. 
Text:   
William H. Sadlier, Creed: A Course on Catholic Belief, 1998
William H. Sadlier, New Testament: A Course on Jesus Christ and His Disicples, 1998
McBride, Teen Catechism, 1996

 

Social Studies

The focus for seventh grade is on the continued development of knowledge and skills acquired in previous social studies programs. Students will study Africa, Asia, and Australia by examining social, economic, and political institutions as they analyze similarities and differences among societies. While concepts are drawn from history and the social sciences, the primary discipline is geography, especially cultural geography. This focus provides students with a frame work for studying local, regional, national, and global issues that concern them; for understanding the interdependence of the world in which they live; and for making informed judgments as active citizens.
Text:    Glencoe McGraw-Hill, Exploring Our World: Africa, Asia, and Australia, 2008

 

Language Arts 

Literature and Writing
Seventh grade students use oral language, written language, and media and technology for expressive, informational, argumentative, critical, and literary purposes. Students also explore the structure of language and study grammatical rules in order to speak and write effectively.  While emphasis in seventh grade is placed on argument, students also:
  • Express individual perspectives in response to personal, social, cultural, and historical issues
  • Interpret and synthesize information
  • Critically analyze print and non-print communication
  • Use effective sentence construction and edit for improvements in sentence formation, usage, mechanics, and spelling
  • Interpret and evaluate a wide range of literature
Argument communication is the focus of grade 7 English language arts and is assessed in this grade by the Writing Assessment. Continuing to build on the foundation of argument, students in grade 7 focus on the importance of the effective use of language and examine how an argument is affected by style and tone. On the Writing Assessment, students demonstrate that they can focus on an argumentative writing task by organizing their thoughts so that their writing progresses logically, by providing sufficient support and elaboration to present their ideas clearly, and by skillfully controlling their writing so that it is appropriate to the purpose, the audience, and the context of the writing task. Students are prepared for this assessment through studying a variety of argumentative works; by learning to analyze problems and solutions in various contexts and situations; and by creating arguments that evaluate by justifying judgments with logical relevant reasons, clear examples, and supporting details.
Texts:
Pearson, Prentice Hall Literature, Grade 7, 2005
Supplemental Books:
Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes by Eleanor Corr
Children of the River by Linda Crew
Goodbye Vietnam by Gloria Wheelan
The Other Side of Truth by Beverly Naidoo
Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli
Titanic by Allan Wolf
The Lottery Rose by Shirley Jackson
Tangerine by Edward Bloor
The Last Book in the Universe by Rodman Philbrick     
Summer Reading
Each year students will choose from a variety of thematically selected novels, varying in genre and Lexile level. Students will be required to read one novel and write a paper focused on the theme of the summer reading assignment. The novel choices and themes will change yearly.
This is a sampling of a summer reading list from a previous year. The theme of this summer reading list was Friendship.
El Deafo by Cece Fell (Graphic Novel)
Fish in a Tree by Linda Mullaly Hunt (Fiction)
The Honest Truth by Dan Gemeinhart (Fiction)
All the Answers by Kate Messner (Fiction)
Crossover by Kwame Alexander (Poetry and Fiction)
I Will Always Write Back: How One Letter Changed Two Lives by Caitlin Alifrenka, Martin Ganda, and with Liz Welch (Nonfiction)
Grammar
The purpose of the 7th grade Grammar Curriculum is to:
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing
Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening
Use punctuation (commas, parentheses, dashes) that set off nonrestrictive/parenthetical elements
Text:    Glencoe McGraw-Hill, Writer’s Choice: Grammar and Composition, Grade 7, 2004
                        William H. Sadlier, Inc., Vocabulary Workshop Level B, 2005     
Science 
The first unit covers motion, the effects of forces on motion and the graphical representations of motion.  How kinetic and potential energy contribute to the mechanical energy of an object are explained. Included are simple machines such as inclined planes, pulleys, levers and wheel and axles and how they are used to create mechanical advantage and increase efficiency.
Students study Earth’s atmosphere, weather, and climate and the effects on humans.  This includes the movement of air masses; high and low pressure systems, and frontal boundaries to storms (including thunderstorms, hurricanes, and tornadoes) and other weather conditions that may result. Weather data is collected from direct observations and measurement (wind speed and direction, air temperature, humidity and air pressure).
Included are lessons on the processes, structure, and functions of living organisms that enable them to survive, reproduce and carry out the basic functions of life. Students compare the structures and functions of plant and animal cells, including major organelles (cell membrane, cell wall, nucleus, chloroplasts, mitochondria, and vacuoles).  Students learn to infer patterns of heredity.  The lessons conclude with the general functions of the major systems of the human body and ways these systems interact with each other to sustain life.
Text:    Discovery Education Science Techbook

 

Math

Pre-algebra students are placed in either grade level or advanced classes.  Glencoe Math Accelerated: A Pre-Algebra Program is organized into units based on groups of related standards called domains. The standards for  mathematical practices are embedded throughout the course.
The curriculum includes, but is not limited to:
  • The Language of Algebra
  • Operations with Integers
  • Operations with Rational Numbers
  • Powers and Roots
  • Ratio, Proportion, and Similar Figures
  • Percents
  • Algebraic Expressions
  • Equations and Inequalities
  • Linear Functions
ALEKS Math Lab
ALEKS is an adaptive, online math program that uses artificial intelligence and open-response questioning to identify precisely what each student knows and doesn’t know. Through truly individualized learning and assessment, ALEKS delivers a personalized learning path using the exact topics each student is most ready to learn.
www.ALEKS.com
Text:    Glencoe McGraw-Hill, Math Accelerated:  A Pre-algebra Program, 2014

 

 

Eighth Grade

 

Religion

The eighth grade religion course of study concentrates on the history of the Catholic Church.  Unit one’s main topics for study and exploration include the following:  images and models of the Church, Mary’s preeminence as Mother of the Church, the four marks of the Church which describe her identity and her mission, growth in knowledge and appreciation of Catholic practices and beliefs, and the importance of sharing the Good News.
Unit two centers on salvation history and the developments in the Church over twenty centuries.  Included in these topics is information about the great saints of each era.  There is also a strong emphasis placed on the ever-abiding presence of the Holy Spirit in the Church.  
There is also a focus on Catholic Morality as founded on the Ten Commandments and Beatitudes.  Students focus is on how the Commandments and Beatitudes relate to their lives, present and future, and how the decisions they make on a daily basis affect them and the lives of all humanity which was created in the image of God.
Text:   
William H. Sadlier, Morality: A Course on Catholic Living, 1996
William H. Sadlier, Liturgy and Worship: A Course on Prayer and the Sacraments, 1998
McBride, Teen Catechism, 1996

 

Social Studies

The focus of social studies in eighth grade is on North Carolina, from the Constitution to present day.  Stated goals for this curriculum year are to examine the roles of people, events and issues in North Carolina and their contribution to the course of American history.  The course of study will evolve from several strands:  Our Catholic Ideals, Citizenship and Government, History, Geography, and Economics.
Text:    Glencoe McGraw-Hill, The American Journey:  United States and North Carolina History, 2008
 

Language Arts

Literature and Writing
Eighth grade students use oral language, written language, and other media and technology for expressive, informational, argumentative, critical, and literary purposes. They continue to refine their study of language and grammar in order to speak and write effectively. Although emphasis in eighth grade is placed on using information for a specific task, students also:
  • Express individual perspectives through analysis and personal response
  • Refine understanding and use of argument
  • Critically analyze print and non-print communication
  • Use effective sentence construction and edit for improvements in sentence formation, usage, mechanics, and spelling
  • Interpret and evaluate a wide range of literature
Teaching in the argumentative environment does not end after the Writing Assessment.  Students in Grade 8 continue to evaluate argumentative works with more sophistication.  Instruction focuses on identifying the social context of argumentative works; understanding counter argument; and, by judging the effectiveness of tone, style and the use of language.  Students learn to use language to convince or persuade an audience.  Students will use these skills as they prepare research presentations that are a major focus in 8th grade.
Texts: Pearson, Prentice Hall Literature, Grade 8, 2005
Supplemental Books:
The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
The Giver by Lois Lowry
Zane's Trace by Allan Wolf
The Land by Mildred Taylor
To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Healing Water by Joyce Moyer Hostetter
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
Summer Reading
Each year students will choose from a variety of thematically selected novels, varying in genre and Lexile level. Students will be required to read one novel and write a paper focused on the theme of the summer reading assignment. The novel choices and themes will change yearly.
This is a sampling of a summer reading list from a previous year. The theme of this summer reading list was Friendship.
El Deafo by Cece Fell (Graphic Novel)
Fish in a Tree by Linda Mullaly Hunt (Fiction)
The Honest Truth by Dan Gemeinhart (Fiction)
All the Answers by Kate Messner (Fiction)
Crossover by Kwame Alexander (Poetry and Fiction)
I Will Always Write Back: How One Letter Changed Two Lives by Caitlin Alifrenka, Martin Ganda, and with Liz Welch (Nonfiction)
Grammar
The purpose of the 8th grade Grammar Curriculum is to:
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking
Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening
Use verbs in the active and passive voice and in the conditional and subjunctive mood to achieve particular effects (e.g., emphasizing the actor or the action; expressing uncertainty or describing a state contrary to fact)
Use punctuation (commas, parentheses, dashes) that set off nonrestrictive/parenthetical elements
Spell correctly
Text:   
Glencoe McGraw-Hill, Writer’s Choice: Grammar and Composition, Grade 8, 2004
William H. Sadlier, Inc., Vocabulary Workshop Level C, 2005

 

Science

Students begin the year learning about properties of matter and the changes that occur when matter interacts with other substances.  Students learn to classify matter as elements, compounds, or mixtures based on how the atoms are packed together in arrangements. Chemical and physical properties of the elements and how they are arranged on the Periodic Table are investigated.  The unit finishes with how the idea of atoms and a balanced chemical equation support the law of conservation of mass.
Next are lessons on the environment and the implications of the depletion of renewable and nonrenewable energy resources and the importance of conservation. Students develop an understanding of the hydrosphere and its effects on humans.  A summary is given on how Earth’s oceans are a reservoir of nutrients, minerals, dissolved gases, and life forms. This covers estuaries, marine ecosystems, upwelling, the behavior of gases in the marine environment, the value and sustainability of marine resources, and deep ocean technology.
Students gain an understanding of the history of Earth and its life forms based on evidence of change recorded in fossil records and landforms.  An explanation on the use of fossils, ice cores, composition of sedimentary rocks, faults, and igneous rock formations found in rock layers are used as evidence. Also explained is the relationship between genetic variation and an organism’s ability to adapt to its environment.
An understanding of the hazards caused by agents of diseases is developed in the next unit. Lessons summarize the basic characteristics of viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites relating to the spread, treatment, and prevention of disease and how biotechnology is used.
In the next unit, students gain an understanding of ecosystems.  This includes the relationships among producers, consumers, and decomposers and how they coexist and compete.  An explanation is given on the flow of energy within food webs is interconnected with the cycling of matter including water, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and oxygen.
Students end with a study on molecular biology and how food provides the energy and molecules required for building materials, growth, and survival of all organisms.  A relationship among a healthy diet, exercise, and the general health of the body is explained.
Text:    Discovery Education Science Techbook
 

Math

Algebra students are placed in either grade level or advanced classes.  Glencoe Aglegra 1 is organized into units based on groups of related standards called domains. The standards for  mathematical practices are embedded throughout the course.
The curriculum includes, but is not limited to:
  • Numbers and Expressions
  • Equations and Functions
  • Linear Relationships
  • Exponential Relationships
  • Statistics and Data
  • Polynomial Expressions and Equations
  • Functions and Modeling
ALEKS Math Lab
ALEKS is an adaptive, online math program that uses artificial intelligence and open-response questioning to identify precisely what each student knows and doesn’t know. Through truly individualized learning and assessment, ALEKS delivers a personalized learning path using the exact topics each student is most ready to learn.
www.ALEKS.com
Text:    Glencoe McGraw-Hill, Algebra 1, 2014